Grocery Store

Old Photos of grocery store

 

Piggly Wiggly was the first self-service grocery store, opening in 1916.

 

 

Polish grocery, 1922, Detroit

 

 

Interior of a dry grocer’s shop in downtown Vancouver, Washington, circa 1909.

 

 

Advertisements

Dean Martin: That’s Amore

Classic song: When I Fall in Love

That’s Entertainment!

That’s Entertainment! is a 1974 compilation film released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer to celebrate its 50th anniversary. It was followed by two sequels and a related film called That’s Dancing!.

The film, compiled by its writer-producer-director, Jack Haley, Jr.  under the supervision of executive producer Daniel Melnick, turned the spotlight on MGM’s legacy of musical film from the 1920s through the 1950s, featuring performances culled from dozens of the studio’s famous films. Archive footage of

Judy Garland

Eleanor Powell

Lena Horne

Esther Williams

Ann Miller

Kathryn Grayson

Howard Keel

Jeanette MacDonald

Cyd Charisse

June Allyson

Mickey Rooney

Mario Lanza

and many others was featured.

Released during the height of the Watergate scandal and just after the Vietnam war, That’s Entertainment! was marketed with a tagline of “Boy, do we need it now!” The idea of celebrating the happy-go-lucky musicals of an earlier era hit a nerve with a nostalgic public; That’s Entertainment! was hailed by critics and would become one of the top twenty highest-grossing films of 1974.

The film was compiled in various segments hosted by a succession of the studio’s legendary stars:

 Frank Sinatra

Gene Kelly

Fred Astaire

and others like: Peter Lawford, Donald O’Connor, Debbie Reynolds, Mickey Rooney, Bing Crosby, James Stewart, Elizabeth Taylor, and Liza Minnelli.

Most of the hosts were filmed on MGM’s famous backlot, which looks disturbingly ramshackle and rundown in this film, because MGM had sold the property to developers and the sets were about to be demolished (several of the stars, including Bing Crosby, remark on this during their segments). The most notable degradation can be seen when Fred Astaire revisits the ruins of a train station set that had been used in the opening of The Band Wagon two decades earlier, and when Peter Lawford revisits exteriors used in his late-40s musical, Good News. That’s Entertainment! was the last major project to be filmed on the backlot.

Over the years, under the leadership of Louis B. Mayer and others, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer has produced a series of musical films whose success and artistic merit remain unsurpassed in motion picture history. There were literally thousands of people …. artists, craftsmen and technicians …. who poured their talents into the creation of the great MGM musicals. This film is dedicated to them.

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious:  is an English word, with 34 letters, that was in the song with the same title in the 1964 Disney musical film Mary Poppins. The song was sung by Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke.

 

Sharon Tate

Sharon Marie Tate (January 24, 1943 – August 9, 1969) was an American actress. During the 1960s she played small television roles before appearing in several films. After receiving positive reviews for her comedic performances, she was hailed as one of Hollywood’s promising newcomers and was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for her performance in Valley of the Dolls (1967). She also appeared regularly in fashion magazines as a model and cover girl.

Married to film director Roman Polanski in 1968, Tate was eight and a half months pregnant when she and her unborn child were murdered in her home, along with four others, by followers of Charles Manson.

Photo of the criminal: Charles Manson

A decade after the murders, Tate’s mother, Doris, in response to the growing cult status of the killers and the possibility that any of them might be granted parole, organized a public campaign against what she considered shortcomings in the state’s corrections system. It resulted in amendments to the California criminal law in 1982, which allowed crime victims and their families to make victim impact statements during sentencing and at parole hearings.

photo of Debra Tate (Sharon’s sister), Doris Tate (Sharon’s mother) and Roman Polanski at Sharon’s funeral.

Doris Tate was the first person to make such an impact statement under the new law, when she spoke at the parole hearing of one of her daughter’s killers, Charles “Tex” Watson. She believed changes in the law had afforded her daughter dignity that had been denied her before, and that she had been able to “help transform Sharon’s legacy from murder victim to a symbol of victims’ rights”.

Other photos for Sharon

Vera-Ellen 1940’s dancer

MAMBO ITALIANO

DEAN MARTIN

Rosemary Clooney

Rare Photos for Marliyn Monroe

Click one of the links below to see Rare photos of Marliyn Monroe 

MARILYN: Never-Published Photos 

UNPUBLISHED: Marilyn Parties, 1952

Marilyn Monroe: Life and Times

LIFE’s Best Marilyn Monroe Photos

See more Marilyn Monroe

Andy Williams songs

” Only for the romantic Ppl ”

Moon River

By Audrey Hepburn

By Andy Williams

By Patti Page

“Moon River” is a song composed by Johnny Mercer (lyrics) and Henry Mancini (music) in 1961, for whom it won that year’s Academy Award for Best Original Song. It was originally sung in the movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Audrey Hepburn, although it has been covered by many other artists. The song also won the 1962 Grammy Award for Record of the Year.

It became the theme song for Andy Williams, who first recorded it in 1961 and performed it at the Academy Awards ceremonies in 1962. He sang the first eight bars at the beginning of his television show and also named his production company and venue in Branson, Missouri after it. Williams’ version was disliked by Cadence Records president Archie Bleyer, who believed it had little or no appeal to teenagers.

Gloria Gaynor 1970’s best songs

Never can say goodbye 1974 and I will survive 1978

Pingu Snowboarding


 

I remmeber that I was watching this tv series in my childhood at KTV2 everyday after noon.

Pingu is a Swiss stop-motion claymated television series created by Otmar Gutmann. The series was produced by The Pygos Group and Trickfilmstudio for Swiss television. The show is about a family of anthropomorphic penguins at the South Pole. The main character is the family’s son and title character, Pingu.

The show ran originally for 4 seasons from 1986 to 1998 on SF DRS. In 1998, there were 2 Pingu episodes made (one of them being “Pingu & the Doll”) that never aired due to schedule problems. In 1999, they showed the 2 episodes with a Pingu marathon between commercials. However, HiT Entertainment’s request for more episodes convinced Pygos to bring back the show in 2004, with 2 more seasons. When the show’s final episode aired, they stopped making Pingu due to low advertising & was canceled yet again in the beginning of 2011, so HiT decided to upload clips of Pingu to YouTube.

Sofia Loren and Jayne Mansfield most famous images

In April 1957, Jayne Mansfield bosom was the feature of a notorious publicity stunt intended to deflect attention from Sophia Loren during a dinner party in the Italian star’s honor. Photographs of the encounter were published around the world. The most famous image showed Loren’s shocked and disapproving gaze falling upon the cleavage of the American actress who, sitting between Loren and her dinner companion, Clifton Webb, had leaned over the table, allowing her breasts to spill over her low neckline and exposing one nipple. The image was one of several taken in the same minutes as the image visible left. A similar incident, resulting in the full exposure of both breasts, occurred during a film festival in West Berlin, when Mansfield was wearing a low-cut dress and her second husband, Mickey Hargitay, picked her up so she could bite a bunch of grapes hanging overhead at a party; the movement caused her breasts to erupt out of the dress. The photograph of that episode was a sensation, appearing in newspapers and magazines with the word “censored” hiding the actress’s exposed bosom.

Martha Graham

 

Martha Graham (May 11, 1894 – April 1, 1991) was an American dancer & choreographer of modern dance, whose influence on dance has been compared to the influence Stravinsky had on music, Picasso had on the visual arts, or Frank Lloyd Wright had on architecture.

Graham invented a new language of movement, and used it to reveal the passion, the rage and the ecstasy common to human experience. She danced and choreographed for over seventy years, and during that time she was the first dancer ever to perform at The White House, travel abroad as a cultural ambassador, and receive the highest civilian award of the USA: the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

In her lifetime she received honors ranging from the Key to the City of Paris to Japan’s Imperial Order of the Precious Crown. She said, “I have spent all my life with dance and being a dancer. It’s permitting life to use you in a very intense way. Sometimes it is not pleasant. Sometimes it is fearful. But nevertheless it is inevitable.”

Martha Graham was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1894. Her father George Graham was what in the Victorian era was known as an “alienist”, an early form of psychiatry. The Grahams were strict Presbyterians. Dr. Graham was a third generation American of Irish descent and her mother Jane Beers was a tenth generation descendant of Puritan Miles Standish. With a physician’s salary, the Grahams had a high standard of living. Dr. Graham often brought home to his wife strawberries in the dead of winter when they were very exotic and difficult to come by. Martha was strongly discouraged from considering any career in the performing arts.

In 1925, Martha was employed at the George Eastman School of Design where Rouben Mamoulian was head of the School of Drama. Among other performances, together they produced a short two color film called The Flute of Krishna, featuring Eastman students. Mamoulian left Eastman shortly thereafter and Graham chose to leave also, even though she was asked to stay on.

In 1926, the Martha Graham Center of Contemporary Dance was established. One of her students was heiress Bethsabée de Rothschild with whom she became close friends. When Rothschild moved to Israel and established the Batsheva Dance Company in 1965, Graham became the company’s first director.

In 1936, Graham made her defining work, “Chronicle”, which signaled the beginning of a new era in contemporary dance. The dance brought serious issues to the stage for the general public in a dramatic manner. Influenced by the Wall Street Crash, the Great Depression and the Spanish Civil War, it focused on depression and isolation, reflected in the dark nature of both the set and costumes.

During 1938, Erick Hawkins was the first man to dance with her company. The following year, he officially joined her troupe, dancing male lead in a number of Graham’s works. They were married in 1948. He left her troupe in 1951, and they divorced in 1954.

Her largest-scale work, the evening-length Clytemnestra, was created in 1958, and features a score by Egyptian-born composer Halim El-Dabh. She also collaborated with composers including Aaron Copland, such as on Appalachian Spring, Louis Horst, Samuel Barber, William Schuman, Carlos Surinach, Norman Dello Joio, and Gian Carlo Menoti. Graham’s mother died in Santa Barbara in 1958. Her oldest friend and musical collaborator Louis Horst died in 1964. She said of Horst “His sympathy and understanding, but primarily his faith, gave me a landscape to move in. Without it, I should certainly have been lost.” Graham’s lighting designer Jean Rosenthal died of cancer in 1967.

Graham’s dance style is based upon contraction and release of the body. She despised the term “modern dance” and preferred “contemporary dance”. She thought the concept of what was “modern” was constantly changing and was thus inexact as a definition.

For a majority of her life Graham resisted the recording of her dances and would not allow them to be filmed or photographed. She believed the performances should exist only live on the stage and in no other form. At one point she even burned volumes of her diaries and notes to prevent them from being seen. There were a few notable exceptions. For example, she worked on a limited basis with still photographers, Imogen Cunningham in the 1930s, and Barbara Morgan in the 1940s. Graham considered Philippe Halsman’s photographs of “Dark Meadows” the most complete photographic record of any of her dances. Halsman also photographed in the 1940s: “Letter to the World”, “Cave of the Heart”, “Night Journey” and “Every Soul is a Circus”. In later years her thinking on the matter evolved and others convinced her to let them recreate some of what was lost.

Graham started her career at an age that was considered late for a dancer. She was still dancing by the late 1960s, and turned increasingly to alcohol to soothe her own despair at her declining body. Her works from this era included roles for herself which were more acted than danced and relied on the movement of the company dancing around her. Graham’s love of dance was so profound that she refused to leave the stage despite critics who said she was past her prime. When the chorus of critics grew too loud, Graham finally left the stage.

In her biography Martha Agnes de Mille cites Graham’s last performance as the evening of May 25, 1968, in a ‘Time of Snow’. But in A Dancer’s Life biographer Russell Freedman lists the year of Graham’s final performance as 1969. In her 1991 autobiography Blood Memory Graham herself lists her final performance as her 1970 appearance in “Cortege of Eagles” when she was 76 years old.

In the years that followed her departure from the stage Graham sank into a deep depression fueled by views from the wings of young dancers performing many of the dances she had choreographed for herself and her former husband. Graham’s health declined precipitously as she abused alcohol to numb her pain. In Blood Memory she wrote:

It wasn’t until years after I had relinquished a ballet that I could bear to watch someone else dance it. I believe in never looking back, never indulging in nostalgia, or reminiscing. Yet how can you avoid it when you look on stage and see a dancer made up to look as you did thirty years ago, dancing a ballet you created with someone you were then deeply in love with, your husband? I think that is a circle of hell Dante omitted.

[When I stopped dancing] I had lost my will to live. I stayed home alone, ate very little, and drank too much and brooded. My face was ruined, and people say I looked odd, which I agreed with. Finally my system just gave in. I was in the hospital for a long time, much of it in a coma.

Graham not only survived her hospital stay but she rallied. In 1972 she quit drinking, returned to her studio, reorganized her company and went on to choreograph ten new ballets and many revivals. Her last completed ballet was 1990’s Maple Leaf Rag.

She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1976 by President Gerald Ford (the First Lady Betty Ford had danced with Graham in her youth).

Graham choreographed until her death in New York city from pneumonia in 1991 at the age of 96. She was cremated, and her ashes were spread over the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in northern New Mexico.

In 1998, Time listed her as the “Dancer of the Century” and as one of the most important people of the 20th century.

The most requested dance materials at the New York Public Library have to do with the work of Martha Graham.

Graham was inducted into the National Museum of Dance C.V. Whitney Hall of Fame in 1987.

  • I LOVE RETRO